30 November 2022

Posts Tagged ‘Virginia’s warbler’

Birds on the Ridge

Tuesday, September 14th, 2021
Chukars, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 14 September 2021.
Chukars four.

Under a cloudless sky (with a slight haze of smoke), this cool morning’s hike turned out to be a pretty good one. Encountered waves of finches, spied two warblers on the move, saw eight towhees headed together in southerly direction—essentially enjoyed a little migratory action.

Captain Jack and I also had a nice visit chat with one human and a couple dog friends.

Plus, I heard the distinctively onomatopoetic calls of Chukars from high up the shady slope above us. Having had a little experience with the species, I said to Jack something like, “Wonder if I can them up on the ridge.”

And, sure enough, there they were.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:13 a.m. (8:13 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch**
2. Northern Flicker (v)
3. Rock Pigeon*
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Mourning Dove*
7. Lesser Goldfinch*
8. Chipping Sparrow
9. Western Tanager (v)
10. Chukar
11. Virginia’s Warbler
12. Yellow-rumped Warbler

Elsewhere

13. Red-tailed Hawk
14. Black-chinned Hummingbird
15. California Quail (v)

Mammals

Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Cool in the Shade

Wednesday, June 2nd, 2021
Black-headed Grosbeak (fem.), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 02 June 2021.
Black-headed Grosbeak (fem.).

Headed to the trailhead a bit earlier this morning, considering the temp was eventually supposed to reach 90° (F) today. Cool in the shade, warm in the sun. (No clouds that I could see.) Despite this dry, dry landscape, there are birds to be seen.

E.g., a female Black-headed Grosbeak. A hard-to-spy Virginia Warbler. A few gnatcatchers and Mourning Doves. Also saw a snake of some kind (garter snake? racer?), an Eight-spotted Skimmer, and a Rock Squirrel.

Tomorrow’s high is supposed to be about 95°.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:11 a.m. (8:11 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Lazuli Bunting
2. Black-headed Grosbeak
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
6. House Finch**
7. Warbling Vireo (v)
8. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
9. Pine Siskin (v)
10. Black-billed Magpie
11. Virginia’s Warbler (v)
12. Black-capped Chickadee
13. Chipping Sparrow (v)
14. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
15. Mourning Dove
16. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
17. Song Sparrow* (v)

Elsewhere

18. European Starling
19. American Robin
20. Eurasian Collared-dove
21. California Quail
22. Rock Pigeon
23. Barn Swallow

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Warming

Tuesday, June 1st, 2021
Lazuli Bunting (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 01 June 2021.
Lazuli Bunting (singing).

It’s that time of spring when things go from kind of warm to hot. Dog and I got to the trailhead early enough to enjoy some cool shade before the sun topped the ridge, but the last half mile was a little toasty. Still not as toasty as this afternoon. Which was not as toasty as tomorrow afternoon is forecast to be.

Still a goodly number of bird species—including a gang of first-year Western Tanagers, a stealthy Cooper’s Hawk, and the usual singing buntings. Although number of singing buntings and towhees was down a bit from yesterday.

We might even head up a little earlier tomorrow, dog and I.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:24 a.m. (8:24 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Lazuli Bunting
2. Black-headed Grosbeak
3. American Robin*
4. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Black-capped Chickadee
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. Western Tanager
9. House Finch**
10. Cooper’s Hawk
11. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
12. Virginia’s Warbler (v)
13. Chipping Sparrow (v)
14. Warbling Vireo (v)
15. Chukar (v)
16. Mourning Dove
17. Pine Siskin (v)
18. Black-billed Magpie*

Elsewhere

19. Eurasian Collared-dove
20. California Quail
21. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2022 by 3IP