20 October 2021

Archive for April, 2021

Warm Day

Friday, April 30th, 2021

As forecast, today brought a little warm-up. I might’ve hoped for more in the way of arriving migrants, but the lack of such an influx didn’t dampen my morning hike with dog. At all.

It was a nice one. A little longer than usual, with a little more altitude. Plus, I spotted a first-of-year Ruby-crowned Kinglet.

And insects are out: butterflies, regular flies, silk and filaments. And flowers—heard (but did not see) what sounded like a Black-chinned Hummingbird. (Heard what sounded like a bunting, too, but could not confirm.)

More birding fun is on the near horizon.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:26 a.m. (8:26 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Spotted Towhee
2. American Robin*
3. Black-capped Chickadee
4. Hummingbird (sp.)
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
6. Ruby-crowned Kinglet†
7. House Finch**
8. Chipping Sparrow
9. Northern Flicker (v)
10. Song Sparrow** (v)
11. Turkey Vulture
12. California Quail*
13. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
14. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)

Elsewhere

15. House Sparrow (v)

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere
†First-of-year bird

First Spring Warbler

Thursday, April 29th, 2021
Orange-crowned Warbler (first-of-year), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 29 April 2021.
Orange-crowned Warbler (first-of-year).

A nearly cloudless, chilly morn—but not as chilly as yesterday. Soon enough, in fact, the rising sun warmed us up considerably, dog and me. And there were birds.

Heard, then saw, a male American Goldfinch. Not a migrant necessarily, but my first since last year. Two vultures moving through. A calling Red-breasted Nuthatch. A calling quail. Two scrub-jays “kissing.” A couple vultures circling, A solitary solitaire.

On our return, not far above the trailhead, I heard the sudden, loud song of a warbler in a leafing-out maple nearby. I left the trail and slid down the slope a bit and finally got a glimpse of it: a first-of-year Orange-crowned Warbler. (I’m determined now to become wholly familiar with their song.)

Tomorrow it’s supposed to get to 80° (F). I expect more new birds moving through.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:12 a.m. (8:12 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Song Sparrow** (v)
2. American Robin*
3. Spotted Towhee
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. American Goldfinch
6. Rock Pigeon*
7. Red-breasted Nuthatch
8. Townsend’s Solitaire
9. Northern Flicker** (v)
10. California Quail
11. Lesser Goldfinch* (v)
12. House Finch**
13. Cooper’s Hawk
14. Turkey Vulture
15. Dark-eyed Junco
16. Orange-crowned Warbler†

Elsewhere

17. House Sparrow (v)

Mammals

Rock Squirrel
Mule Deer
Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere
†First-of-year bird

Clear

Wednesday, April 28th, 2021
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 28 April 2021.
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay.

The day dawned clear. A little remnant snow along the trails, although not nearly as muddy as the past two days. Few bird species to start, but a flurry toward the end of my hike with dog.

(Aside: I thought about leaving Jack home this morning, since his back legs aren’t as sturdy as they used to be, and I thought he might benefit from a day off. However, he seems eager, and in fact led the way more than once this morning. Plus, he’d miss all the smells I worry about him, though.)

Heard a couple bird calls I didn’t recognize. Neve got a look. New arrivals, I believe, perhaps sparrows. Should be a flurry of migrants in the next few warm days.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:23 a.m. (8:23 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
2. American Robin*
3. Spotted Towhee**
4. House Finch**
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
6. Rock Pigeon*
7. Black-capped Chickadee
8. Pine Siskin (v)
9. Dark-eyed Junco
10. Turkey Vulture
11. Northern Flicker (v)
12. Lesser Goldfinch (v)

Elsewhere

13. House Sparrow (v)
14. Song Sparrow (v)
15. Cooper’s Hawk

Mammals

Rock squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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