3 August 2020 Rockport, Maine, USA 

Posts Tagged ‘red-tailed hawk’

Quietude

Wednesday, July 29th, 2020
American Robin (juvie), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 29 July 2020.
American Robin (juvie).

This morning’s hike up the cool, shady foothills began quietly. It took a good fifteen minutes before I had a half-dozen bird species on my (mental) list. Feathered things did begin to flit and flutter, but mostly hidden by vegetation or in swift flight from one place to another. Time to lay low, apparently. The final count (thirteen) was the lowest I can remember.

One of a pair of tanagers, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 29 July 2020.
One of a pair of tanagers.

Still, things were interesting—plenty of young buntings and towhees and robins. (In fact, all that hidden chipping and subtle vocalizing made for a challenging birding excursion.) No outlandish sightings, true.

But lucky thirteen turned out to be another pair of tanagers in the tanager.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
2. American Robin
3. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
4. Mourning Dove
5. Lazuli Bunting
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird
8. House Finch**
9. Rock Pigeon*
10. Spotted Towhee
11. Pine Siskin (v)
12. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
13. Western Tanager

Elsewhere

14. Black-billed Magpie
15. House Sparrow
16. Red-tailed Hawk

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

You Never Know

Saturday, July 25th, 2020
Warbling Vireo, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 25 July 2020.
Warbling Vireo.

This morning’s walk with dog up our usual trail began eerily quiet. For several minutes, I neither saw nor heard a single bird. Then, for the next few, I heard one, two, three birds. Individual birds, that is (although they happened to be of three different species).

We got to the trailhead a bit later than yesterday, so this seemed odd. At first. Until I began to consider the warmth, dryness, photoperiod, and all the other subtle (to humans) factors that must go into a bird’s daily activities.

With a few minutes more, the numbers had increased to about normal for the season. And by hike’s end, I had a nice list, with a few notable sightings.

As, while birding, I often say out loud: “You never know.”

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:15 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Red-tailed Hawk (v)
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Mourning Dove*
6. Lazuli Bunting
7. American Robin*
8. House Finch**
9. Lesser Goldfinch**
10. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
11. Spotted Towhee
12. Black-capped Chickadee
13. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
14. Virginia’s Warbler
15. Warbling Vireo
16. Pine Siskin
17. Chipping Sparrow
18. California Quail* (v)
19. Western Tanager

Elsewhere

20. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)
21. Black-billed Magpie

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Summertime

Friday, July 24th, 2020
Black-billed Magpie, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 24 July 2020.
Black-billed Magpie.
A very young Mountain Cottontail, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 24 July 2020.
A very young Mountain Cottontail.

My full summer in Utah has taught me a few things—like when different bird species fledge, when they begin to sing less, and how different species behave in different weather and at different times of day.

I’ve also learned that, while most birds seem to hang around their nesting patches, a few leave for lower elevations (where presumably the pickings are more favorable). That’s what the local corvids do. For instance, I’ve seen a lot fewer scrub-jays lately—and once-common magpies have been relatively rare the past few weeks. I suspect they find ample helpings of peanuts down in the neighborhood.

Dog and I encountered exactly one magpie along the trails this morning (and not a single scrub-jay). We also saw one very cute young Mountain Cottontail.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Rock Pigeon*
2. Black-chinned Hummingbird
3. Mourning Dove*
4. House Finch**
5. Pine Siskin
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. American Kestrel
8. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
9. Lazuli Bunting
10. Spotted Towhee
11. Lesser Goldfinch
12. Broad-tailed Hummingbird*
13. Cooper’s Hawk
14. Warbling Vireo
15. Western Tanager
16. Black-headed Grosbeak
17. Chipping Sparrow
18. Virginia’s Warbler
19. Black-billed Magpie
20. Red-tailed Hawk (v)

Elsewhere

21. American Robin
22. California Quail
23. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
24. Barn Swallow

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is an intermittent record of what's outside my window in Rockport, Maine, USA (44°08'N latitude, 69°06'W longitude), and vicinity. —Brian Willson



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