8 August 2020

Posts Tagged ‘Woodhouse’s scrub jay’

Neighborhood Quail

Thursday, August 6th, 2020
California Quail family, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 06 August 2020.
California Quail family (in my front yard).
Quail chick on the go, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 06 August 2020.
Quail chick on the go.

This year’s little California Quail can fly pretty well already. I had quite a display out my front window this afternoon: the whole family fluttered over from a neighbor’s yard and ended up in the garden by the curb; then, soon after, they all emerged and, with the adults keeping watch, the little guys poked about in the lawn.

Now that I’ve been here a full year, I’ve come to know the quails’ habits pretty well—their clucks and calls and subtle messages to the young ’uns. They seem to prefer running across the streets and yards and driveways, but they’ll take wing if they have to. (I worry a bit about one neighbor’s outdoor cat, but all I’ve seen in its mouth have been rodents.)

It’s a pretty nice day when you can look out your window at what the quail are up to.

On this morning’s mostly quiet hike with dog, meantime, I spied a tanager, more broad-tails, a Virginia’s Warbler, and da random nuthatch. Also, the young Cooper’s are still hanging around Coyote Canyon.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Rock Pigeon*
2. Mourning Dove*
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
5. Western Tanager
6. House Finch*
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Lazuli Bunting
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. American Robin (v)
11. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
12. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
13. Lesser Goldfinch**
14. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
15. Virginia’s Warbler
16. Red-breasted Nuthatch

Elsewhere

17. House Sparrow (v)
18. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Broad-Tails

Wednesday, August 5th, 2020
Broad-winged Hummingbird (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 05 August 2020.
Broad-winged Hummingbird (male).
Broad-winged Hummingbird (immature male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 05 August 2020.
Broad-winged Hummingbird (imm. male).

On an exceptionally quiet morning, the Broad-winged Hummingbirds were out and about. Even before we reached the cool shade of Coyote Canyon, I heard that familiar cricket-like wing-trill.

Since that wing-trill sounds like it’s coming from everywhere, it generally takes a few minutes to spot an actual hummingbird. (At least it takes me that long.) But I finally spotted one—an immature male perched above the trail in front of dog and me. Then I spied a male in silhouette, spreading its wings and tail.

Dance of the Broad-winged Hummingbird, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 05 August 2020.
Dance of the Broad-winged Hummer.

Finally, the male—which, by the way, followed us a hundred yards or so up the valley—perched in full view and flashed the read feathers of his throat.

Apparently summer is the season of broad-tails.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. Mourning Dove
4. Black-chinned Hummingbird
5. American Robin
6. Mountain Chickadee
7. Spotted Towhee
8. House Finch*
9. Pine Siskin
10. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
11. Lazuli Bunting
12. Black-capped Chickadee
13. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
14. Cooper’s Hawk
15. Eurasian Collared Dove

Elsewhere

16. House Sparrow
17. Barn Swallow

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

The Unexpected

Tuesday, August 4th, 2020
Ruffed Grouse, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 04 August 2020.
Ruffed Grouse.
Plumbeous Vireo, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 04 August 2020.
Plumbeous Vireo.

This morning was chilly compared to recent mornings. Right away, as dog and I started up the switchback, birds began to make themselves apparent. The usual suspects mostly (albeit not singing so much as they used to), until we got to the shade of Coyote Canyon, when things got exciting.

First were the wing-trills of the Broad-tailed Hummingbirds that’ve been following us up the cool valley there in past days. Soon enough I heard heard a short, sweet, subtle warble, which turned out to be a female grosbeak’s. Then I spied my first Warbling Vireo in a few days, a random Yellow Warbler in the leafy maples, then another bird up there I could not quickly ID—apparently a young bird, being fed by a parent. I got a photo, thought, which revealed it to be a Plumbeous Vireo (only my third-ever glimpse of the species).

The short climb was thrillingly birdy. Then, unexpectedly, I happened to notice two Ruffed Grouse in the thick greenery not six feet off the trail. Possibly a female and a young bird. Also unexpectedly, they did not fly—just stood contemplating me as I snapped photos, then moseyed off into the vegetation.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. Mourning Dove*
4. American Robin
5. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
6. House Finch**
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
8. Black-capped Chickadee
9. Black-billed Magpie (v)
10. Spotted Towhee
11. Pine Siskin (v)
12. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
13. Warbling Vireo
14. Plumbeous Vireo
15. Yellow Warbler
16. Black-headed Grosbeak
17. Ruffed Grouse
18. Lazuli Bunting
19. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)

Elsewhere

20. California Quail
21. Song Sparrow
22. House Sparrow (v)
23. Northern Flicker (v)
24. Eurasian Collared Dove

Mammals

Red Squirrel
Mountain Cottontail

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2020 by 3IP