4 August 2020 Rockport, Maine, USA 

Posts Tagged ‘lesser goldfinch’

Banded Pigeon

Sunday, August 2nd, 2020
Rock Pigeon, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 02 August 2020.
Rock Pigeon.

I see more doves and pigeons here than I ever did in Maine. For one thing, there’s an extra species (Eurasian Collared Dove); for another, the pigeons here come in flocks of a hundred or more—at this time of year, at least, when they swoop and veer in huge numbers up and around the foothill canyons.

Alhough I rarely get an up-close look at them, today dog and I encountered a solitary bird perched on a rocky overlook. We stopped. It stayed, I approached nearer. It stayed. I got near enough for close-up photos, and the pigeon didn’t move. Then I noticed the blue band around it’s leg.

Not the first banded pigeon I’ve seen here, turns out. I got nothing against pigeons, though. In fact, I rather like ’em.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay (v)
2. Mourning Dove*
3. American Robin
4. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5. House Finch**
6. Rock Pigeon*
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Black-chinned Hummingbird
9. Lazuli Bunting
10. Black-headed Grosbeak
11. Black-capped Chickadee
12. Pine Siskin (v)
13. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
14. Warbling Vireo
15. Black-throated Gray Warbler
16. Virginia’s Warbler
17. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
18. Northern Flicker

Elsewhere

19. Lesser Goldfinch
20. Black-billed Magpie

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Life Goes On

Friday, July 31st, 2020
Broad-tailed Hummingbird (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, UTah, 31 July 2020.
Broad-tailed Hummingbird (male).

Broad-tailed Hummingbirds have not been cooperative when it comes to posing for photos—until today.

I’ve caught glimpses of these high-elevation hummers in Coyote Canyon—the cool, shady valley that dog and I ascend each morning—as they zip around hunting tiny insects among the proliferous bigtooth maple leaves. But the light is dim, and hummingbirds are active, and I sort of gave up.

Today, though, there a few (or more) were making those cricket-like sounds with their wings above us as, so I stopped to watch and listen, and a male decided to perch right in front of me. (I rarely see males, either, since they’re basically chauvinist pigs who sleep around and the leave the nest-building, chick-rearing, and youngster-feeding to females.)

Male Black-throated Gray Warbler feeding fledgling, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, UTah, 31 July 2020.
Male Black-throated Gray Warbler feeding fledgling.

Felt good to grab that photo.

In contrast, just beyond the hummers, I happened upon a male Black-throated Gray Warbler bring a small lacy-winged insect to a begging fledgling.

And so life goes on despite it all.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-chinned Hummingbird
2. Mourning Dove
3. House Finch**
4. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5. American Robin*
6. Eastern Towhee
7. Black-headed Grosbeak
8. Lazuli Bunting
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. Red-breasted Nuthatch
11. Pine Siskin
12. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
13. Cooper’s Hawk
14. Black-throated Gray Warbler
15. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
16. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)

Elsewhere

17. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Quietude, Part 2

Thursday, July 30th, 2020
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 30 July 2020.
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay.

Even quieter this morning. Warmer, breezier, and quieter. Took longer to count more than a handful of species—and the numbers didn’t come until the sun topped the ridge.

Fewer individual birds than yesterday, but lots of juvies still. Saw a warbler I couldn’t ID before it flew. [I think it might’ve been an orange-crowned.] Lots of buntings and towhees still—but few singing.

Nothing rare or thrilling maybe, but Captain Jack and I loved it anyway. Plus, I got a portrait of a scrub-jay.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Rock Pigeon*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
3. Black-capped Chickadee**
4. Mourning Dove
5. House Finch**
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Lazuli Bunting
10. American Robin
11. Warbler (sp.)
12. Pine Siskin (v)
13. Lesser Goldfinch**

Elsewhere

14. Black-billed Magpie
15. Eurasian Collared Dove
16. House Sparrow

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is an intermittent record of what's outside my window in Rockport, Maine, USA (44°08'N latitude, 69°06'W longitude), and vicinity. —Brian Willson



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