29 September 2020

Posts Tagged ‘rock squirrel’

Flickers

Thursday, September 17th, 2020
Northern Flicker, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 17 September 2020.
Northern Flicker (female).

Lately there’ve been a lot of flickers in the neighborhood. You hear them first, then—if you’re lucky (as I was this morning)—you might sneak up and grab a photo.

Pine Siskin, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 17 September 2020.
Pine Siskin.

Today I saw four Northern Flickers (and heard a couple others). Also had a couple of Downy Woodpeckers. Those are the only woodpecker’s I’ve seen here. Which reminds me that I’ve not seen any Utah owls yet—no doubt because they don’t frequent my patch when dog and I got hiking.

Also saw a whole lot of Pine Siskins today all of a sudden. More than a dozen. It’s fun stroll quietly along a deer trail with a sort of secret knowledge that something’s up in the natural world—especially when we can usually hear most other folks we meet on the trail long before they come into view.

(Not that there’s anything wrong with that.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:02 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
2. House Finch*
3. Pine Siskin*
4. Black-capped Chickadee**
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Northern Flicker**
9. Downy Woodpecker
10. American Robin
11. Dark-eyed Junco
12. Red-breasted Nuthatch
13. Black-chinned Hummingbird
14. Lesser Goldfinch* (v)
15. Rock Pigeon

Elsewhere

16. California Quail (v)

Mammals

Rock Squirrel
Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Friluftsliv

Tuesday, September 15th, 2020
Yellow-rumped Warbler, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, UTah, 15 September 2020.
Yellow-rumped Warbler.

I happened to encounter the word friluftsliv this morning soon after my hike with dog. A Norwegian concept, or practice, or custom—meaning something like “open-air living.” But it means more. It means spending time each day surrounded by, contemplating, and paying attention to Nature.

It’s what I’ve done for decades. Huge part of my life. Good living, too.

Hike-wise, another quiet one. But the voices of chickadees made me feel optimistic despite the crazy fires and winds and hurricanes and politics and disease. Plus, I came across my first migrating Yellow-rumped Warbler moving through.

Worth it—the time, the effort, the energy. Worth it always.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:13 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
2. House Finch*
3. Black-capped Chickadee*
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Black-chinned Hummingbird
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Lesser Goldfinch**
9. Northern Flicker (v)
10. Yellow-rumped Warbler
11. Rock Pigeon

Elsewhere

12. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)
13. California Quail
14. House Sparrow

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Variety

Saturday, September 12th, 2020
Mourning Dove, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 12 September 2020.
Mourning Dove.

Another day of variety. Another cool-in-the-morning hike with dog, one with plenty of birds to sneak up on—or try to. Dipped on a few but managed a third long list in a row.

Most interesting to me were: a brief chase of two Cooper’s Hawks; the (newly) unmistakable calls of a pair of Mountain Chickadees; second day of both Hairy and Downy Woodpeckers; a posing Mountain Cottontail.

In this, perhaps my favorite birding time of year, I can’t help but live with a little thrill in my gut and an extra feeling of sweet anticipation in the morning.

(Pretty sure Jack feels it, too.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:16 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay*
3. Lesser Goldfinch*
4. Black-billed Magpie*
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Black-capped Chickadee**
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. Mourning Dove
9. Broad-tailed Hummingbird (wing-trill)
10. Cooper’s Hawk
11. Rock Pigeon*
12. Chipping Sparrow
13. Hairy Woodpecker (v)
14. Black-chinned Hummingbird
15. Mountain Chickadee (v)
16. Pine Siskin
17. Downy Woodpecker (v)
18. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)

Elsewhere

19. California Quail

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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