1 October 2020

Posts Tagged ‘mourning dove’

Fall Birds

Thursday, September 24th, 2020
Cooper’s Hawk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 24 September 2020.
Cooper’s Hawk.

First full autumn hike this morning. (Yesterday’s began in summer.) Cool enough, but smoky air still—partly from the Neff’s Canyon fire, which is till burning. But also some early excitement.

Up at the old lime quarry [note: I’m assuming that’s what it is, having not yet received verification], within ten minutes of beginning, I heard—then saw—a Rock Wren. (Getting to know its voice, which is kind of delightful.) It saw us, as is its habit pumped its head, then fluttered over a rock and away. But then another wren popped up from within the quarry hole (at least I assume it was a second bird, although it’d be the first pair I’ve seen together). Managed to snap some kind of bad photos.

Rock Wren, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 24 September 2020.
Rock Wren.

But about fifty feet farther along the trail, I froze. There, perched in the open, was an adult Cooper’s Hawk. Aha! Perhaps that’s what was making the wren(s?) all anxious—not dog and me, after all.

(Later, passing the quarry on our return, I snagged a decent Rock Wren photo.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:25 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch*
2. Mourning Dove*
3. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
4. Black-capped Chickadee
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Rock Wren
7. Cooper’s Hawk
8. Northern Flicker**
9. Mountain Chickadee
10. American Robin
11. Black-billed Magpie*
12. Lesser Goldfinch* (v)

Elsewhere

13. Rock Pigeon

v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Something in the Air

Tuesday, September 22nd, 2020
Golden Eagle, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 22 September 2020.
Golden Eagle.

The equinox. Autumn began today about 9:30 a.m. (MDT). Coincidentally, a stout wind blew, and the leaves of oak and maple (especially maple) were blowing around like little birds. I could smell fall in the air.

I could also smell smoke in the air—and saw some billowing puffs rising in the southeast above the Millcreek Ridge. I’d assumed at first the fire burned in Millcreek Canyon, but it turned out to be Neff’s Canyon, next one over. It’d started as about a 10 acre fire but by late afternoon had grown to sixty. Planes and helicopters in the air.

Also in the air: a pair of golden eagles. They flew south, slowly, against the wind, their winds held in place, never moving.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:18 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Red-breasted Nuthatch
2. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
3. House Finch*
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Pine Siskin (v)
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Northern Flicker** (v)
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. Lesser Goldfinch*
11. Hummingbird (sp)
12. Golden Eagle
13. Mountain Chickadee
14. Yellow-rumped Warbler
15. Mourning Dove

Mammals

Red squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Dips

Friday, September 18th, 2020
Black-chinned Hummingbird (imm./fem.), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 18 September 2020.
Black-chinned Hummingbird (imm./fem.).

Got a whiff of smoke this morning on my hike with dog. A haze hovered over the basin. The fires in California are alarming, to say the least—as is the local drought. Thought we’d be getting some rain tomorrow, but apparently not. Going on two months without significant rain.

Perhaps that’s why things continue to be quiet up the foothills trails. Mostly the usual suspects this morning, bu also a couple of birds whose calls I didn’t recognize. One in particular—with a semi-harsh, semi-musical chip-note—flitted out of a juniper and showed itself to be warbler-sized with flashes of yellow. Tried to track it down but didn’t see it again. Another little chattery bird, too, I couldn’t sneak up on.

“Dips” in birding lingo usually mean you’ve heard of a rare or interesting sighting and go looking for it but fail to find it—i.e., you “dipped” on the bird. In my mind the same applies in the shorter term: you see or hear something curious but don’t end up getting a good look. Happens a lot.

But also, on occasion, you stumble onto a pretty great sighting without even trying. It all works out in the end, I suppose.

No smoky smell later in the day. I hope at least the West Coast gets a little rain.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:13 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
3. Pine Siskin
4. American Robin**
5. Black-chinned Hummingbird
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Northern Flicker**
9. Rock Pigeon*
10. Black-capped Chickadee
11. Wood-warbler (sp)
12. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
13. Black-billed Magpie*
14. Red-tailed Hawk

Elsewhere

15. European Starling
16. American Crow
17. Mourning Dove
18. Song Sparrow

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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