30 November 2022

Posts Tagged ‘rock pigeon’

Bluebirds

Friday, November 18th, 2022
Eastern Bluebird, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 18 November 2022.
Eastern Bluebird.

A morning much like yesterday’s—a bit colder (20s (F)), not quite as breezy, perhaps a bit more overcast. Not as many bird species, but quite a few more individual birds.

The species with the most numbers: yellow-rumps. Goldfinches came in a close second. Also a bunch of chickadees. Three woodpecker species, several crows—and even a departing raven. But most noteworthy would be the bluebirds.

A little gang at the summit, perching, posing. Even a single individual way down by the wooded trailhead. Any day with bluebirds—even a nippy day in November—is a good ’un.

(Also notable: en route early, saw a handsome buck loping across a field.)

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7:19 a.m., I hiked most trails.

1. American Goldfinch
2. Hairy Woodpecker (v)
3. American Crow*
4. Black-capped Chickadee**
5. Tufted Titmouse (v)
6. Eastern Bluebird
7. Yellow-rumped Warbler
8. Downy Woodpecker
9. Northern Flicker (v)
10. Common Raven

Elsewhere

11. White-breasted Nuthatch (v)
12. Mallard (v)
13. Rock Pigeon
14. Herring Gull

Mammals

White-tailed Deer
American Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

Harrier

Saturday, October 29th, 2022
Northern Harrier, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 29 October 2022.
Northern Harrier.

Still in the 30s (F) when dog and I hit the trail this a.m. Bright, though, with barely a breeze, and the birds began to let themselves be heard—and seen. Chickadee, titmouse, nuthatch, woodpeckers, jays. They even showed up in numbers: a whole bunch of bluebirds in flight, even more robins bouncing around the treetops, and dozens of cawing crows.

But most fun for me were hawks. First, I spied a Cooper’s Hawk (which had the robins nervous), and later we came upon a handsome Northern Harrier, patrolling low above the blueberry barrens as they do here in both spring and fall. Got a glimpse of one last month, and now another in October.

It’ll be nice to see a “gray ghost” come spring.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 8:06 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Black-capped Chickadee
2. American Robin
3. Brown Creeper (v)
4. Tufted Titmouse
5. Eastern Bluebird
6. Blue Jay
7. White-breasted Nuthatch
8. Downy Woodpecker (v)
9. Hairy Woodpecker (v)
10. Yellow-rumped Warbler
11. Cooper’s Hawk
12. American Crow
13. American Goldfinch (v)
14. Northern Harrier
15. Savannah Sparrow
16. Dark-eyed Junco (v)

Elsewhere

17. Golden-crowned Kinglet (v)
18. Rock Pigeon
19. European Starling
20. Rock Pigeon

Mammals

Eastern Gray Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

Wren

Friday, October 28th, 2022
Carolina Wren, Rockport, Maine, 28 October 2022.
Carolina Wren.

The day dawned chilly. Not yet freezing, but in the 30s (F). Still, a bright sun rising lent an air of expectation to the morning.

Nothing much at first, though. Captain Jack didn’t mind, but a little breeze chilled my fingers. During our ascent through the woods, I counted only five bird species.

Nearing the summit, though, things got a bit interesting: flicker, junco, nuthatch. Rounding out our usual circuit (down and back up the main trail), I added several more (jay, sparrow, gull, another nuthatch species), and returning through the woods, I managed to bump the list up to fifteen.

But the excitement this day was my managing to get my first look at a Carolina Wren that’s been singing in the trees around my house. It even stopped moving for long enough for me to grab a candid photo.

Thanks, CW!

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 8:06 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Black-capped Chickadee**
2. American Crow*
3. Downy Woodpecker
4. American Robin
5. Yellow-rumped Warbler
6. Northern Flicker
7. Dark-eyed Junco
8. White-throated Sparrow (v)
9. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
10. Blue Jay
11. Song Sparrow (v)
12. Herring Gull*
13. White-breasted Nuthatch
14. Purple Finch (v)
15. Hairy Woodpecker

Elsewhere

16. Northern Cardinal (v)
17. Rock Pigeon
18. Carolina Wren

Mammals

Eastern Gray Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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