28 October 2020

Posts Tagged ‘chukar’

Buntings, Revisited

Thursday, June 25th, 2020
Lazuli Bunting (female), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 25 June 2020.
Lazuli Bunting (female), collecting dog hairs at the Pipeline Overlook.

Lazuli Buntings are small, vocal, attractive, birds—and the most common species in my patch. You’d think I’d begin to take them for granted. But no.

Lazuli Bunting (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 25 June 2020.
Lazuli Bunting (male).

During this morning’s long, high hike with Captain Jack, we encountered a bunch of lazulis. Singing males (as usual), and furtive females. Upon topping the switchback that leads to the terminus of the Pipeline Trail we accidentally snuck up on a pair at the overlook. The female was hopping about in the rocks, plucking up dog hairs—lots and lots of dogs accompany their humans up there—shooing away the randy male who flitted nearby.

I counted twenty-three buntings on today’s two-and-a-half hour, three-and-a-third mile excursion. I’m sure I missed a few.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked about 1,200 feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch**
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. Lazuli Bunting
4. American Robin*
5. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
6. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
10. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
11. Black-capped Chickadee
12. Orange-crowned Warbler
13. Chukar (v)
14. Western Tanager (v)
15. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
16. Warbling Vireo (v)

Elsewhere

17. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)
18. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Prime Imperative

Tuesday, June 9th, 2020
Lazuli Buntings mating, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 09 June 2020.
Lazuli Buntings mating.

Birding is a little slower now than it was a couple weeks ago. Oh, there’re plenty of wild birds about—singing, calling, flitting around—but they’re less obvious, more secretive. They’ve got other thoughts on their mind.

In fact, I’m guessing that most of the resident species either have eggs to incubate, nestings to feed, or fledglings to bring to adulthood. But this morning I happened upon at least one couple of buntings with a nest in need of eggs—right in broad daylight.

Meanwhile, the grosbeak parents are still jamming regurgitated food rather roughly down the throats of their tiny new-hatched nestlings. (Guessing their wide beaks make it something of a challenge.) Gnatcatchers, scrub-jays, and magpies (at least) have fledglings to raise.

Busy times for all.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:45 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie*
2. Lazuli Bunting
3. American Robin* (v)
4. Black-chinned Hummingbird
5. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (v)
6. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
7. Black-headed Grosbeak
8. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
9. California Quail*
10. Pine Siskin
11. Spotted Towhee
12. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay*
13. House Finch*
14. Cliff Swallow
15. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
16. Warbling Vireo
17. Chukar (v)
18. Chipping Sparrow (v)
19. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
20. Mourning Dove*
21. Downy Woodpecker

Elsewhere

22. Eurasian Collared Dove
23. Song Sparrow
24. European Starling
25. Rock Pigeon

Mammals

None

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Spring Color

Wednesday, June 3rd, 2020
Lazuli Bunting, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 03 June 2020.
Lazuli Bunting.

A lovely hike this morning. Dog and I did what I call the Millcreek Ridge Circuit—up the switchback to the Pipeline Trail lookout, then climb the ridge west a while, then take the shady valley back down to the lower trail.

New (to me) flowers blooming every day, it seems (some with lovely fresh smells I’ve never smelled). First time I’ve seen all the shades of spring green—plus, of course, the bright June colors of western birds.

(Note: I believe the gnatcatchers have fledged.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:45 a.m., I hiked about 1,200 feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie*
2. Black-headed Grosbeak
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Lazuli Bunting
5. House Finch*
6. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Rock Pigeon
10. American Robin*
11. Song Sparrow** (v)
12. Pine Siskin (v)
13. Chipping Sparrow (v)
14. Warbling Vireo (v)
15. Chukar
16. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
17. Western Tanager (v)
18. California Quail*

Elsewhere

19. House Sparrow (v)
20. European Starling
21. Mourning Dove
22. Black-capped Chickadee (v)

Mammals

None

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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