30 November 2022

Posts Tagged ‘blue-gray gnatcatcher’

Farewell, Utah

Thursday, April 21st, 2022
Red-tailed Hawk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 21 April 2022.
Red-tailed Hawk.

The wind was a-whippin’ when dog and I hit the trailhead this morning. Temps about 60 (F), but 20, 30, 40 mile-an-hour gusts. Although it was a favorable southerly wind, I didn’t exactly expect to see a bunch of birds—let alone any first-of-year migrants—in such extreme conditions.

In fact, I didn’t see any first-of-year birds. But I managed to see a good bunch of species.

Most notably were a couple of windblown White-crowned Sparrows. And on a utility pole just above the sparrows perched the neighborhood red-tail. Quail, vulture, gnatcatcher, kinglet—a pretty good selection for the beginnings of a turbulent weather day.

Couple of rainy, snow days coming up, looks like, but Sunday looks nice. Hitting the road on Monday.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:55 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. Ruby-crowned Kinglet (v)
3. Song Sparrow** (v)
4. Rock Pigeon*
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Eurasian Collared-dove*
7. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
8. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
9. House Finch*
10. California Quail** (v)
11. White-crowned Sparrow
12. Red-tailed Hawk
13. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (v)
14. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
15. Turkey Vulture
16. Pine Siskin (v)

Elsewhere

17. House Sparrow (v)
18. Lesser Goldfinch
`19. European Starling
20. American Crow (v)

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

FOYs

Wednesday, April 20th, 2022
Black-throated Gray Warbler (first of year).
Black-throated Gray Warbler (first of year).

For the fourth straight day, I saw a first-of-year bird on my morning hike with dog. Today’s bird—whose chip note I mistook for a yellow-rump’s at first—was a Black-throated Gray Warbler. Also spied the gnatcatcher again (which I assume is the same bird, since it’s unusually early for the species.

Otherwise, two hawks (Cooper’s and a redtail), were noteworthy, as well as a little herd of deer apparently spooked up the trail by a hiker.

Four days before we take off for Maine, Captain Jack and me. A lot to do yet, but we’ll manage somehow—along with our daily hike).

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:46 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2. American Robin*
3. Song Sparrow**
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Pine Siskin**
6. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. House Finch*
9. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
10. Rock Pigeon*
11. California Quail* (v)
12. Cooper’s Hawk
13. Black-throated Gray Warbler
14. Red-tailed Hawk

Elsewhere

15. Eurasian Collared-dove
16. House Sparrow
17. Lesser Goldfinch
`18. European Starling
19. American Kestrel

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

FOY Birds

Monday, April 18th, 2022
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (first-of-year bird), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 18 April 2021.
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (first-of-year).

A bright morning, temps about 45 (F) or so. Slight breeze. Looked like the overnight wind directly was more or less southerly, so I thought it possible a new migrant or two might pop up somewhere.

Welp, two did.

The first was a Chipping Sparrow that popped up in a juniper along the deer trail as I was looking to spot a junco. Was a lovely surprise.

The second was a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher that popped up on our return hike (by which time the temperature was much warmer). Actually heard the bird first, then spied it—also in a juniper.

I’d forgotten how much joy first-of year spring migrants bring.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:58 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. House Finch*
3. Spotted Towhee
4. Black-capped Chickadee**
5. Rock Pigeon
6. Pine Siskin** (v)
7. Black-billed Magpie*
8. Northern Flicker (v)
9. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
10. California Quail* (v)
11. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
12. Cooper’s Hawk
13. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
14. Dark-eyed Junco
15. Chipping Sparrow
16. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
17. Turkey Vulture

Elsewhere

18. Eurasian Collared-dove
19. House Sparrow
20. European Starling

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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