8 July 2020 Rockport, Maine, USA 

Posts Tagged ‘northern flicker’

Yard Birds

Sunday, July 5th, 2020
Bullock’s Oriole (female), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 05 July 2020.
Bullock’s Oriole (female).

Another lovely hike this morning. Encountered only two humans on the trails—as many as rock squirrels. But got glimpses of vireo and grosbeaks and many chickadees. The highlight of the day, however, was a bird I spied out my front window: a female Bullock’s Oriole fluttering around in the roses, hunting insects and flies.

The oriole got me thinking of all the cool birds I’ve seen out there in the yard this past year. Hummingbirds and finches, corvids and sparrows, thrushes and assorted hawks (at least three species). Thinking I might even like to keep a yard list.

Yep, I do cherish my daily hike with Captain Jack. But you don’t really have to travel far to see good birds.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:30 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Rock Pigeon*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay (v)
3. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
4. Lazuli Bunting
5. House Finch*
6. Black-capped Chickadee
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird
8. Black-headed Grosbeak
9. Spotted Towhee
10. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
11. Pine Siskin (v)
12. Lesser Goldfinch**
13. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
14. Warbling Vireo
15. Northern Flicker (v)

Elsewhere

16. American Robin
17. Eurasian Collared Dove
18. Mourning Dove
19. European Starling
20. Bullock’s Oriole

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

*Voice only elsewhere

Fourth

Saturday, July 4th, 2020
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 04 July 2020.
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher.

Did the ridge circuit with dog this morning, a three-and-a-half mile hike up Coyote Canyon (so-called) to a summit above the terminus of the Pipeline Trail. Warm, sunny, breezy, dry.

Not nearly as many individual birds as yesterday, nor as many species. But all around it was a lovely Independence Day hike for both Captain Jack and me.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:30 a.m., I hiked 1,200 feet or so up a mountain.

1. Mourning Dove
2. Black-capped Chickadee
3. House Finch*
4. Lazuli Bunting
5. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
6. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
7. American Robin*
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
10. Pine Siskin (v)
11. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
12. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
13. Warbling Vireo (v)
14. Chipping Sparrow (v)
15. Virginia’s Warbler (v)
16. Turkey Vulture
17. Northern Flicker (v)

Elsewhere

18. Black-billed Magpie
19. Eurasian Collared Dove
20. European Starling

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

Slow Turn

Friday, June 26th, 2020
Chipping Sparrow, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 26 June 2020.
Chipping Sparrow.

Around the solstices, the changes in the lengths of days slows, like the far points of a swinging pendulum. At the equinoxes, the photoperiod increases or lessens swiftly. These early summer days can seem much the same, one after another—but for birds, the opposite is the case.

Now’s the time of nestlings and fledglings and hiding and growing and putting on weight and storing energy. Migration’s not all that far away.

Today, dog and I got scolded by multiple species (most of which were out of sight) for getting too near the young ’uns. Buntings, chippies, vireos, hummingbirds—and gnatcatchers. Especially gnatcatchers.

At the end of our hike, we surprised a mama quail with itty bitty babies that’d hatched not many hours before—iny little peeping that things could scramble away in the understory.

A lot of things happen in a hurry during this slow solstitical turn.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. Rock Pigeon
3. Lazuli Bunting
4. Northern Flicker** (v)
5. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
6. House Finch*
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. Black-billed Magpie (v)
9. Spotted Towhee
10. Black-capped Chickadee**
11. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
12. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
13. Warbling Vireo (v)
14. Black-throated Gray Warbler
15. Chipping Sparrow
16. Common Raven
17. California Quail*
18. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay (v)

Elsewhere

17. Eurasian Collared Dove
18. Mourning Dove

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is an intermittent record of what's outside my window in Rockport, Maine, USA (44°08'N latitude, 69°06'W longitude), and vicinity. —Brian Willson



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