1 October 2020

Posts Tagged ‘broad-tailed hummingbird’

Good Company

Wednesday, September 16th, 2020
Black-capped Chickadee, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 16 September 2020.
Black-capped Chickadee.

Within ten or fifteen minutes of hitting the trail this morning, I could tell last night brought fair migration winds. I say “fair” winds because of the good variety of species I spied early—Western Tanager, Western Wood-pewee, Yellow-rumped Warbler, and a few other species-in-a-hurry that I couldn’t ID. Has me psyched about the days to come.

Western Wood-pewee, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 16 September 2020.
Western Wood-pewee.

But the sweetest thing about my hike with dog this cool morning was the company of Black-capped Chickadees. What with the recent spate of western fires, a hurricane making landfall, and other dramatic climate events, it’d be easy to fall into a funk. But there they are, the chickadees, their optimistic-sounding voices as they check in with each other—voices so matter-of-fact and unworried that they attract other little silent species moving through the foliage.

One even flew within inches of my head today. I thought it might land on my hat, but it didn’t. Maybe someday.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:11 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
2. House Finch*
3. Black-capped Chickadee**
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Black-chinned Hummingbird
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Spotted Towhee
8. Northern Flicker**
9. Western Tanager
10. Downy Woodpecker
11. Sparrow (sp)
12. Western Wood-pewee
13. American Robin
14. Yellow-rumped Warbler
15. Lesser Goldfinch*
16. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
17. House Wren

Elsewhere

18. California Quail

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Four Downys

Monday, September 14th, 2020
Downy Woodpecker (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 14 September 2020.
Downy Woodpecker (male).

Weather-wise, a morning much like the last two or three. Bird-wise, rather inauspicious. I did spot a Green-tailed Towhee (first bird of the hike), but otherwise the usual species, dipped on a couple of species, no great photos.

A highlight was the appearance in the burnt patch by a little pack four male Downy Woodpeckers. Not sure I’ve ever seen such a thing before. Cool.

(Meanwhile, though, I’m alarmed by a report of hundreds of thousands of dead birds found in New Mexico and other places in western states. Perhaps the record wildfires forcing too-early migration, perhaps some mysterious other factor. Whatever the cause, it felt like a kick in the gut.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:16 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Green-tailed Towhee
2. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
3. Black-capped Chickadee
4. Mourning Dove
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
6. Black-chinned Hummingbird
7. Spotted Towhee
8. House Finch*
9. Downy Woodpecker
10. American Robin
11. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
12. Pine Siskin (v)
13. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
14. Lesser Goldfinch*
15. Sparrow (sp.)

Elsewhere

16. California Quail
17. Rock Pigeon
18. Barn Swallow

Mammals

Rock Squirrel
Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Serene Moment

Sunday, September 13th, 2020
Rock Wren, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 13 September 2020.
Rock Wren.
Broad-tailed Hummingbird, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 13 September 2020.
Broad-tailed Hummingbird.

Encountered another Rock Wren this morning—on a quiet but fun (they’re all fun) hike with dog—but this was the first I’ve seen that wasn’t in the little abandoned quarry atop the bluff. Far afield, in fact.

And it participated in the most serene moment of our excursion, in fact: I’d taken some photos of the wren when a hummingbird flew up and hovered a few seconds about two feet from my face. (“Well, hello, there,” I said.)

And after that we just stood there, Jack and I, in the presence (at a little distance) of a Rock Wren.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:16 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
2. Black-capped Chickadee
3. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
4. American Kestrel
5. Spotted Towhee
6. House Finch*
7. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
8. Rock Wren
9. Black-billed Magpie*
10. Northern Flicker

Elsewhere

11. Eurasian Collared Dove
12. European Starling

*Also elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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