2 December 2022

Posts Tagged ‘yellow warbler’

Back to the Island

Saturday, September 24th, 2022
Cape May Warbler, Monhegan Island, 24 September 2022.
Cape May Warbler.
Black Head (from White Head), Monhegan Island, 24 September 2022.
Black Head (from White Head).

Today I traveled with Captain Jack (who, ironically, hates boats) from Port Clyde, Maine, to Monhegan Island for a few days of birding. Since we’ll be busy wandering and visiting, I’ll just be posting a daily list and a photo or two until our return. It’s been I believe five years, and I missed this place. (Woo-hoo!)

Port Clyde to Monhegan List

1. Herring Gull
2. Broad-winged Hawk
3. Double-crested Cormorant
4. Belted Kingfisher
5. Common Loon
6. Northern Flicker
7. Blue Jay
8. Mallard
9. Red-eyed Vireo
10. Yellow-bellied Sapsucker
11. Golden-crowned Kinglet
12. White-throated Sparrow
13. Dark-eyed Junco
14. Yellow Warbler
15. Gray Catbird
16. Red-breasted Nuthatch
17. Ring-necked Pheasant
18. Great Cormorant
19. Merlin
20. Peregrine Falcon
21. Cape May Warbler
22. Yellow-rumped Warbler
23. Blackpoll Warbler
24. Black-throated Green Warbler
25. Dickcissel
26. Song Sparrow
27. American Goldfinch
28. American Robin
29. Mourning Dove
30. Sharp-shinned Hawk

Swainson’s Thrush

Saturday, September 10th, 2022
Swainson’s Thrush, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 10 September 2022.
Swainson’s Thrush.

No clouds in the sky this fair morning, but a light wind blowing from the west. Few birds to start, but it seems at this time of year they’re moving around in the edges, readying for migration.

Most notable? A cooperative Swainson’s Thrush that posed for me. I’ve seen so few of these—maybe four or five, tops—that it’s still a thrill. Especially when I have photographic proof. Also noteworthy: another Yellow-bellied Flycatcher and a little wave of Yellow-rumped Warblers.

Nice species count today. What count might I have tomorrow? I wonder.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7:30 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Northern Flicker (v)
2. American Crow*
3. Red-eyed Vireo
4. Black-capped Chickadee
5. American Robin (v)
6. Cedar Waxwing
7. Red-breasted Nuthatch**
8. Eastern Towhee
9. Gray Catbird
10. Swainson’s Thrush
11. American Goldfinch
12. Yellow-bellied Flycatcher
13. Common Yellowthroat (v)
14. Blue Jay**
15. Yellow-rumped Warbler
16. Eastern Phoebe
17. Song Sparrow
18. Herring Gull*
19. White-breasted Nuthatch (v)
20. Yellow Warbler
21. Savannah Sparrow
22. Tufted Titmouse (v)
23. Eastern Wood-pewee (v)
24. Pileated Woodpecker (v)

Elsewhere

25. Mourning Dove

Mammals

Eastern Chipmunk

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

Sparrow

Sunday, September 4th, 2022
Savannah Sparrow, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine 04 September 2022.
Savannah Sparrow.

Another in a string of fair, cool mornings. When much of the rest of the country is suffering through heat waves and droughts and fires and flooding, dog and I are particularly lucky in these challenging days.

Plus, I had thirty bird species on my list today. Notable: a gull in the woods (?), first Hermit Thrush in a while, first Veery in a while, first Ovenbird in a while, first Savannah Sparrow in a while. The latter, in particular rather thrilled me.

What a lovely morning. To be followed by a day of rain—or so they say.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7:40 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Black-capped Chickadee
2. American Crow
3. Red-eyed Vireo
4. Red-bellied Woodpecker
5. Ovenbird
6. Herring Gull
7. Brown Creeper
8. Hermit Thrush
9. White-breasted Nuthatch
10. Tufted Titmouse
11. Red-breasted Nuthatch
12. Eastern Towhee
13. Veery
14. Gray Catbird
15. American Goldfinch
16. Hairy Woodpecker
17. Song Sparrow
18. Yellow-rumped Warbler
19. Purple Finch
20. Common Yellowthroat
21. Savannah Sparrow
22. Field Sparrow
23. Cedar Waxwing
24. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
25. Yellow Warbler
26. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
27. Eastern Phoebe
28. Blue Jay
29. Least Flycatcher
30. Northern Flicker

Elsewhere

31. Northern Cardinal
32. Carolina Wren

Mammals

Eastern Gray Squirrel
Eastern Chipmunk

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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