8 July 2020 Rockport, Maine, USA 

Posts Tagged ‘downy woodpecker’

Blue

Monday, June 22nd, 2020
Backside of Lazuli Bunting, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 22 June 2020.
Backside of Lazuli Bunting.

Today was a cloudless day. My morning hike with dog was cool and clean. This afternoon, the sun was bright, bright, and the sky was blue, blue.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:45 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin* (v)
2. Black-headed Grosbeak (v)
3. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
4. Lazuli Bunting
5. House Finch**
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
10. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
11. Warbling Vireo (v)
12. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
13. Chipping Sparrow
14. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
15. Song Sparrow** (v)

Elsewhere

16. Downy Woodpecker
17. Mourning Dove
18. California Quail
19. Rock Pigeon
20. House Sparrow
21. Eurasian Collared Dove
22. European Starling

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Prime Imperative

Tuesday, June 9th, 2020
Lazuli Buntings mating, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 09 June 2020.
Lazuli Buntings mating.

Birding is a little slower now than it was a couple weeks ago. Oh, there’re plenty of wild birds about—singing, calling, flitting around—but they’re less obvious, more secretive. They’ve got other thoughts on their mind.

In fact, I’m guessing that most of the resident species either have eggs to incubate, nestings to feed, or fledglings to bring to adulthood. But this morning I happened upon at least one couple of buntings with a nest in need of eggs—right in broad daylight.

Meanwhile, the grosbeak parents are still jamming regurgitated food rather roughly down the throats of their tiny new-hatched nestlings. (Guessing their wide beaks make it something of a challenge.) Gnatcatchers, scrub-jays, and magpies (at least) have fledglings to raise.

Busy times for all.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:45 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie*
2. Lazuli Bunting
3. American Robin* (v)
4. Black-chinned Hummingbird
5. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (v)
6. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
7. Black-headed Grosbeak
8. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
9. California Quail*
10. Pine Siskin
11. Spotted Towhee
12. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay*
13. House Finch*
14. Cliff Swallow
15. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
16. Warbling Vireo
17. Chukar (v)
18. Chipping Sparrow (v)
19. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
20. Mourning Dove*
21. Downy Woodpecker

Elsewhere

22. Eurasian Collared Dove
23. Song Sparrow
24. European Starling
25. Rock Pigeon

Mammals

None

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Warblers

Wednesday, May 27th, 2020
Black-throated Gray Warbler, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 27 May 2020.
Black-throated Gray Warbler.

On a mostly overcast morning, dog and I had a very nice hike. Coolish still (but this will change), and no others encountered on our trek up the switchback and around the hillsides.

MacGillivray’s Warbler, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 27 May 2020.
MacGillivray’s Warbler.

The usual suspects, bird-wise—including two resident warblers singing dependably in their preferred locations: MacGillivray’s and black-throated gray. If birding scarcity increases value, warblers are precious here.

Maine’s wood-warblers got me birding in the first place exactly 40 years ago—I couldn’t resist their crazy spring music in the woodlands of northern New England. A couple dozen species pass through Maine during migration. Where I lived, maybe a dozen stick around.

Since I moved to the high desert last summer, I’ve encountered far fewer warbler species. Resident species in my patch number maybe a half-dozen. Still, the two I saw today were enough to whet my warbler whistle.

Later, this warm afternoon, as I worked at my front table, I saw a large, winged shadow pass across the lawn. Peeked out and spied a Red-tailed Hawk soaring in the warm air—and perhaps 1,000 feet above it, two or three paragliders.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:45 a.m., I hiked several hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Downy Woodpecker**
2. Black-billed Magpie*
3. House Finch*
4. Black-headed Grosbeak
5. Black-chinned Hummingbird*
6. American Robin*
7. Lazuli Bunting
8. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
9. Spotted Towhee
10. Song Sparrow* (v)
11. California Quail* (v)
12. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
13. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
14. Warbling Vireo
15. Chipping Sparrow
16. MacGillivray’s Warbler
17. Black-throated Gray Warbler
18. Black-capped Chickadee (v)

Elsewhere

19. Eurasian Collared Dove
20. Red-tailed Hawk

Mammals

None

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is an intermittent record of what's outside my window in Rockport, Maine, USA (44°08'N latitude, 69°06'W longitude), and vicinity. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2020 by 3IP