26 May 2022

Posts Tagged ‘American kestrel’

FOYs

Wednesday, April 20th, 2022
Black-throated Gray Warbler (first of year).
Black-throated Gray Warbler (first of year).

For the fourth straight day, I saw a first-of-year bird on my morning hike with dog. Today’s bird—whose chip note I mistook for a yellow-rump’s at first—was a Black-throated Gray Warbler. Also spied the gnatcatcher again (which I assume is the same bird, since it’s unusually early for the species.

Otherwise, two hawks (Cooper’s and a redtail), were noteworthy, as well as a little herd of deer apparently spooked up the trail by a hiker.

Four days before we take off for Maine, Captain Jack and me. A lot to do yet, but we’ll manage somehow—along with our daily hike).

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:46 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
2. American Robin*
3. Song Sparrow**
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Pine Siskin**
6. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
7. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
8. House Finch*
9. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
10. Rock Pigeon*
11. California Quail* (v)
12. Cooper’s Hawk
13. Black-throated Gray Warbler
14. Red-tailed Hawk

Elsewhere

15. Eurasian Collared-dove
16. House Sparrow
17. Lesser Goldfinch
`18. European Starling
19. American Kestrel

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Wren

Saturday, March 26th, 2022
Rock Wren, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 26 March 2022.
Rock Wren.

Toward the end of my lovely, even warmer (albeit earlier) morning hike with dog, I still had only seven species on my list. Perhaps it was the dryness, or the earlier hour, or both, but most of the wildlife activity involved deer—about twenty of them roaming quite near us.

Then I spied the Rock Wren. Just yesterday, I’m pretty sure, I wondered when I’d see one by the old Monarch Quarry—and this one popped up quite near that hole. Every migration I see them there. First-of-year bird.

Then, coming down the switchback, I spied a kestrel, headed north. And then I heard the call of a collared-dove.

Tomorrow should similarly, unseasonably warm. What new bird will I see?

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:30 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Spotted Towhee
2. American Robin*
3. House Finch*
4. Rock Pigeon
5. Black-capped Chickadee** (v)
6. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
7. Northern Flicker**
8. Rock Wren†
9. American Kestrel
10. Eurasian Collared-dove**

Elsewhere

14. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
15. Black-billed Magpie (v)
16. European Starling
17. Song Sparrow (v)

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also Elsewhere
**Voice only Elsewhere

Towhee

Tuesday, March 22nd, 2022
Spotted Towhee, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 22 March 2022.
Spotted Towhee.

Another lovely morning hike with Captain Jack. Nippy to start again, comfortable at the end. Much of the recent snow has gone, and the excitement builds for spring happenings.

Birds about, the usual pre-spring suspects. The most interesting encounter began with the whine of a towhee. I stopped on the trail, Jack did likewise. A moment later, the source of the whine flitted up to a twig ahead of us about ten yards. Snapped off a couple photos—and then the bird flew straight in our direction, touching down within feet of me. I had to back off the zoom a bit to focus.

Just a hint of fun birding things to come.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 8 a.m. (9 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin* (v)
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
3. Pine Siskin
4. Northern Flicker* (v)
5. Rock Pigeon*
6. House Finch*
7. Black-capped Chickadee
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Black-billed Magpie**
10. Dark-eyed Junco
11. Song Sparrow** (v)

Elsewhere

12. House Sparrow (v)
13. European Starling
14. American Kestrel

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also Elsewhere
**Voice only Elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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