23 April 2021

Posts Tagged ‘dark-eyed junco’

Good Day

Monday, April 19th, 2021
Black-capped Chickadee at nest cavity, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 19 April 2021.
Black-capped Chickadee at nest cavity.

We got an early start this day, dog and I. No unusual birds at the outset (although we both spied a cottontail), then when we got to little Coyote Canyon, I made a split decision to hike the ridge, and we headed up the switchback to the Pipeline Overlook.

A clear morning, cool in the shade, warm in the sun. From about 800 feet up, I happened to look down and see a coyote casually trotting along a trail we’d hiked about 45 minutes before. New flowers along the trail, little patches of remnant show.

Toward the end, I happened to spot a Sharp-shinned Hawk circling above us—a migrant perhaps. A good day, with exciting times to come.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:16 a.m. (8:16 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. House Finch**
3. European Starling*
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay (v)
6. Rock Pigeon*
7. Mountain Chickadee
8. Northern Flicker (v)
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. Juniper Titmouse (v)
11. Chukar (v)
12. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
13. Dark-eyed Junco
14. Sharp-shinned Hawk

Elsewhere

13. House Sparrow (v)
14. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
15. Song Sparrow (v)

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Mountain Coyote

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Numbers

Friday, April 16th, 2021
Spotted Towhee (female), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 16 April 2021.
Spotted Towhee (female).

Another wet, nippy morning—but only a little light snow falling. Got busy early, so dog and I didn’t head up until later than usual. Just us up there, aside from a bunch of unseen deer and a cottontail and a whole bunch of birds.

Numbers, not species—although I did happen to spy a pair of Canada Geese headed north. Saw at least forty robins and half as many juncos. Watched quietly for a while as chickadees cleaned out a nest cavity for imminent use. A Cooper’s Hawk was near their nest, and the scrub-jays have gone pretty quiet—nesting also, I’d wager.

Quite a few Spotted Towhees, too, as usual. I’ve learned to tell the males from females, the former being quite black on top, and the latter being very dark brown. Eastern Towhees are a breeze by comparison.

Tomorrow’s supposed to be sunny.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:40 a.m. (9:40d MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. Song Sparrow* (v)
3. House Finch*
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Northern Flicker (v)
6. Juniper Titmouse
7. Dark-eyed Junco
8. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
9. Black-capped Chickadee*
10. Canada Goose
11. Cooper’s Hawk
12. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay*

Elsewhere

13. House Sparrow (v)
14. Rock Pigeon
15. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
16. Mourning Dove
17. Cedar Waxwing
18. European Starling

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Fickle Weather

Thursday, April 15th, 2021
Red-tailed Hawk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 15 April 2021.
Red-tailed Hawk.
Vesper Sparrow, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 15 April 2021.
Vesper Sparrow.

Wind again last night, but it subsided a bit by morning. Overcast, but none of yesterday’s buckets of precipitation—rather the promise of some light snow showers. Dog and I headed up the switchback into a morning of fickle weather.

A little breeze, some patches of blue, then a smattering of icy snowflakes that made a pattering sound on last year’s old bigtooth maple leaves, then the snow stopped. Muddy trails still, but many more interesting birds—including a pair of hawk species, three dozen robins, a pair of finches gathering nest material, and a Vesper Sparrow.

That was the funnest moment—near the end of our hike. I thought it a Song Sparrow at first glance as it hopped along the trail ahead of us, visiting grassy patches. (Must confess I didn’t make the ID until looking at photos later.)

More interesting weather tomorrow, so I’m told.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:45 a.m. (8:45 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. Spotted Towhee
3. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
4. Northern Flicker** (v)
5. House Finch*
6. Dark-eyed Junco
7. Black-capped Chickadee*
8. Red-tailed Hawk
9. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
10. Vesper Sparrow†
11. Song Sparrow* (v)
12. Rock Pigeon*

Elsewhere

13. House Sparrow (v)
14. Eurasian Collared-dove (v)
15. Black-billed Magpie
16. Sharp-shinned Hawk
17. European Starling
18. Lesser Goldfinch

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere
†First-of-year bird

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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