25 January 2021

Posts Tagged ‘red-breasted nuthatch’

Cassin’ses

Thursday, January 14th, 2021
Cassin’s Finches, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 14 January 2021.
Cassin’s Finches.
Cassin’s Finch (male), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 14 January 2021.
Cassin’s Finch (male).

I’d lived here in Utah about a year before I saw my first (ever) Cassin’s Finch. In the past few months, I’ve seen a bunch of ’em.

From what I understand, they tend to wander around in flocks, depending on food, weather, and/or reasons known only to themselves. They’ve been hanging around a lot lately, though, and I’m glad. I like the way they look—all clean-cut and stylish looks. I also like their habit of letting me approach nearer than other finches do. Makes for some nice photos.

I also like Lesser Goldfinches, Pine Siskins, American Goldfinches, and House Finches (in their original native habitat, unlike those back in Maine). But I’ve kind of got a crush on Cassin’s.

(Saw a dozen today.)

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 9:09 a.m. (MST), I hiked several hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch*
2. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
3. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
4. Rock Pigeon*
5. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
6. Spotted Towhee*
7. Black-capped Chickadee
8. Golden Eagle
9. Dark-eyed Junco
10. Cassin’s Finch

Elsewhere

11. European Starling

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Fun Day

Monday, December 7th, 2020
Cooper’s Hawk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 07 December 2020.
Cooper’s Hawk.

We got to the trailhead about ten minutes later this morning than usual. By design, kind of. I wondered if a later start might lead to more action than a hike mostly in the mountain shade.

Right away, the action was pretty great—within about five minutes, I had several species, including a nuthatch, two titmice, a Mountain Chickadee, and a female Downy Woodpecker (later found the male in his usual patch). But then things settled down for much of the rest of the hike.

Until the last hundred yards or so, which brought a flurry of activity: juncos, a Cooper’s Hawk, a singing Townsend’s Solitaire, and two finch species.

Honestly, I doubt the later start had anything to do with it. Still a fun day, though.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:40 a.m. (MST), I hiked several hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
2. Juniper Titmouse
3. Black-billed Magpie*
4. Black-capped Chickadee
5. Mountain Chickadee
6. House Finch (v)
7. Downy Woodpecker
8. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jayl
9. Northern Flicker
10. Spotted Towhee
11. Dark-eyed Junco
12. Cooper’s Hawk
13. Townsend’s Solitaire
14. American Goldfinch (v)
15. Pine Siskin (v)

Mammals

Red Squirrel (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

Goshawk

Thursday, November 26th, 2020
Northern Goshawk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 26 November 2020.
Northern Goshawk.
Downy Woodpecker, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 26 November 2020.
Downy Woodpecker.

Yesterday I decided we’d hike the ridge trail on Thanksgiving this morning, Jack and me. Snowed an inch or two overnight, though, and I thought—Nah. However, when we reached the big ’ol switchback, I changed my mind. We did the hike.

Before that, though, early in our hike, when I didn’t imagine I’d see anything too interesting, what should appear in the Russian olive tree but a Northern Goshawk. Third-ever bird of this species I’ve had, all in this particular patch.

Up the ridge, I spied a solitaire, heard Chukars—and I kept losing one or the other of my new ice grips. [I’d had this brand before, and they were fine, but something changed, apparently.] Didn’t really need them (eventually just took ’em off), but three times I had to retrace my steps to track down the lost grip. Once descending a couple hundred feet, at least. The hike took a good hour longer than usual on account of it.

But, kind of surprisingly, it was totally worth it—spending that extra time up a mountain with my dog.

Thankful.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:17 a.m. (MST), I hiked some 1,200 feet up a mountain.

1. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
2. House Finch* (v)
3. Black-billed Magpie*
4. American Robin (v)
5. Black-capped Chickadee**
6. Northern Goshawk
7. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
8. Downy Woodpecker
9. Dark-eyed Junco
10. Spotted Towhee (v)
11. Townsend’s Solitaire
12. Chukar (v)
13. Northern Flicker (v)
14. Juniper Titmouse (v)
15. Rock Pigeon
16. Lesser Goldfinch (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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