5 October 2022

Savannah

October 4th, 2022
Savannah Sparrow, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 04 October 2022.
Savannah Sparrow.

Similar morning to yesterday’s—but a bit chillier, with a light breeze. Quiet at first but exciting as my hike with dog proceeded (as has been the case on recent days). At least sixty yellow-rumps, bluebirds, nuthatches, sparrows, a random phoebe—and my favorite sparrow at the summit on our return.

If you’ve been following, you know I love Savannah Sparrows—their subdued-yet-tidy attire, their insect-like trill (with a hiccup at the end), just their general behavior (e.g., not as shy as a Song Sparrow).

The little Savannah at the end just made my day.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7:\46 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. American Crow**
2. Yellow-rumped Warbler
3. White-breasted Nuthatch**
4. Hairy Woodpecker
5. Eastern Bluebird (v)
6. Black-capped Chickadee
7. Blue Jay (v)
8. Gray Catbird
9. Eastern Towhee (V)
10. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
11. American Robin
12. Northern Flicker
13. Hermit Thrush
14. American Goldfinch
15. Dark-eyed Junco (v)
16. White-throated Sparrow*
17. Song Sparrow
18. Common Yellowthroat
19. Purple Finch (v)
20. Eastern Phoebe
21. Savannah Sparrow

Elsewhere

22. Wild Turkey
23. Northern Cardinal (v)
24. Tufted Titmouse

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

Subtlety

October 3rd, 2022
Brown Creeper, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 03 October 2022.
Brown Creeper.

Yet nippier this morning under clear blue skies. Slight breeze. Quiet in the woodlands—but birds were flitting about in the trees’ still-clinging leaves. But this is the season of low-key migration. Birds moving urgently over and through the landscape, but keenly aware of the dangers. You have to use your eyes as well as your ears.

Notable were the scores of Yellow-rumped Warblers moving through—by far the most abundant species. (And the only warbler.) Also, a pair of ravens flew over. Two nuthatch species. A couple bluebirds.

Perhaps it is my favorite season because of the subtlety—the lurking about, the laying low. Fall birding is a fun challenge, and a rewarding one.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7:38 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Yellow-rumped Warbler
2. American Goldfinch
3. Ruby-crowned Kinglet (v)
4. Hairy Woodpecker
5. Common Raven
6. American Robin
7. Black-capped Chickadee
8. Blue Jay (v)
9. Gray Catbird (v)
10. American Crow*
11. Brown Creeper
12. Eastern Towhee (v)
13. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
14. White-throated Sparrow
15. Dark-eyed Junco
16. Northern Flicker
17. Purple Finch
18. Eastern Bluebird (v)
19. Song Sparrow
20. White-breasted Nuthatch (v)
21. Tufted Titmouse (v)
22. Red-eyed Vireo

Elsewhere

23. Herring Gull
24. Northern Cardinal (v)

Mammals

Eastern Gray Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

Flitting Migrants

October 2nd, 2022
Swainson’s Thrush, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 02 October 2022.
Swainson’s Thrush.

Again nippy with partial sun, but rather windy when dog and I headed up the hill. With the loudly rustling leaves, it was hard to make out the voices of the birds in the woods—but I followed a couple pods of chickadees, who were (as often is the case) companied by quiet little warblers. Also vireos.

Four warbler spp., three corvid spp., two vireo spp, a pair of Sharp-shinned Hawks, an Osprey, and the southbound flight of three geese. Plus a raven—and another Swainson’s Thrush. (Growing to like the species a lot.)

I wonder what tomorrow will bring.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 8:20 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. American Crow*
2. Purple Finch (v)
3. Black-capped Chickadee**
4. Yellow-rumped Warbler
5. Blue-headed Vireo
6. Red-eyed Vireo
7. Nashville Warbler
8. Black-and-white Warbler
9. Magnolia Warbler
10. Swainson’s Thrush
11. White-throated Sparrow*
12. Sharp-shinned Hawk
13. Canada Goose
14. Eastern Towhee (v)
15. Blue Jay (v)
16. Dark-eyed Junco
17. Osprey
18. Common Raven
19. Tufted Titmouse (v)

Elsewhere

20. Song Sparrow (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

†First-of-year

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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