18 January 2022

Posts Tagged ‘hermit thrush’

Eagle

Wednesday, January 12th, 2022
Golden Eagle, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 12 January 2022.
Golden Eagle.

Decided to hike with Captain Jack earlier this morning, to compare with yesterday (a similar morning). Was much quieter than yesterday to start—but then things got interesting in a hurry.

First I watched an eagle fly above us, headed for a ridge to the north. I watched it touch down on a rock and begin to preen. Then I heard the solitaire again. And then a flock of what I’m pretty sure were redpolls—but I couldn’t tell for sure from their calls. Then we came upon a random Mourning Dove (first in a good while). Finally, on our return, I spied a secretive bird with an eye ring: a Hermit Thrush. Did not expect one of those at this time of year.

Searched for the old Garmin I dropped on the trail yesterday. Found it right on the trail. (Not sure how I missed it yesterday.) And as we headed back down to the switchback, the eagle was still there.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 09:04 MST, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. House Finch** (v)
4. Black-billed Magpie** (v)
5. American Goldfinch (v)
6. Golden Eagle
7. Northern Flicker** (v)
8. Black-capped Chickadee
9. Townsend’s Solitaire (v)
10. Mourning Dove
11. Dark-eyed Junco
12. Hermit Thrush

Elsewhere

13. House Sparrow (v)

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Kestrel

Sunday, September 26th, 2021
American Kestrel, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 26 September 2021.
American Kestrel.

This morning’s lovely hike was serene for the most part. Stll plenty of finches and yellow-rumps, but no outlandish species to speak of—at least not until afternoon. The hike highlight was probably the sudden appearance (amid a small flock of robins up in the juniper barrens) of a solitary Hermit Thrush.

Later, from the back deck, I noticed a couple of birds on a wire. Turns out one was a kestrel—and not far behind it sat a Mourning Dove.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:25 a.m. (8:25 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
3. Northern Flicker (v)
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Rock Pigeon*
6. Yellow-rumped Warbler
7. House Finch**
8. American Robin
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. Hermit Thrush
11. Red-tailed Hawk
12. Lesser Goldfinch

Elsewhere

13. Eurasian Collared-dove
14. House Sparrow
15. Black-billed Magpie (v)

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Surprise Bird

Monday, May 17th, 2021

A lovely hike with dog this clear, birdy morning. Before we’d barely left the switchback, in fact, I had more than a dozen species on my list—including a strange, unexpected bird perched in the big Russian olive tree.

A huge-beaked bird it was, but no Black-headed Grosbeak. Every several seconds it emitted a single bright note, a call I didn’t recognize. Had to be another grosbeak, but which could it be? Not until we got back home and I searched the Cornell Lab site for Utah grosbeaks did I realize what I’d seen: an Evening Grosbeak, a female or immature male.

. Every several seconds it emitted a single bright note, a call I didn’t recognize. Had to be another grosbeak, but which could it be? Not until we got back home and I searched the Cornell Lab site for Utah grosbeaks did I realize what I’d seen: an Evening Grosbeak, a female or immature male.

Decades ago, back in Maine, great flocks of Evening Grosbeaks descended during winter irruptions, and I got to know them very well. And then one year they didn’t return, and I hadn’t seen one since. Not in a span of at least 30 years—and never, I think, a solo individual.

Good to see you, great-beaked bird. I hope you find more of your kind.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 7:05 a.m. (8:05 MDT), I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Song Sparrow** (v)
2. Lazuli Bunting
3. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Red-breasted Nuthatch (v)
6. Spotted Towhee
7. Black-chinned Hummingbird
8. American Robin* (v)
9. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
10. Evening Grosbeak†
11. Chipping Sparrow
12. Rock Wren
13. Rock Pigeon (2)
14. Black-capped Chickadee
15. Warbling Vireo (v)
16. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
17. Black-throated Gray Warbler (v)
18. Orange-crowned Warbler (v)
19. Hermit Thrush
20. House Finch
21. Black-headed Grosbeak
22. Turkey Vulture

Elsewhere

23. House Sparrow
24. Eurasian Collared-dove (v)

Mammals

Red Squirrel
Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere
†First-of-year bird

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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