24 June 2024

Posts Tagged ‘rocky mountain elk’

Elk

Friday, February 25th, 2022
Herd of Rocky Mountain Elk, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 25 February 2022.
Herd of Rocky Mountain Elk.

Got a tip there was a herd of elk up above where Jack and I hike every day. The hour was early(-ish), the sky partly overcast, the temperature—about the same as yesterday. About an inch of snow had fallen overnight.

And there were elk. I counted between thirty and forty in a herd up near the cairn ridge. Watched ’em strolling slowly up the slope toward Grandeur Peak. Handsome animals, even handsomer in a big group. Mixed in were several deer. (Counted about the same number of deer this morning.)

There were birds, too—nine species, usual suspects. None were as photogenic as the elk, though.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 08:46 MST, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Pine Siskin
2. Dark-eyed Junco
3. Black-capped Chickadee**
4. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
5. Song Sparrow* (v)
6. Rock Pigeon*
7. House Finch**
8. Spotted Towhee** (v)
9. American Robin

Elsewhere

10. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
11. Black-billed Magpie

Mammals

Rocky Mountain Elk
Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
* Also Elsewhere
**Voice only Elsewhere

Spotted Towhees

Sunday, March 15th, 2020
Spotted Towhee (female), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 15 March 2020.
Spotted Towhee (female).

In case you can’t tell by now, I’m a patch birder. That is, I like to hike the same trails every day, so I can really get to know the resident bird life (as opposed to racing around visiting rich, exotic locales—not that there’s anything wrong with that.) I like details. Like to dive kinda deep, I guess.

Here in Utah, I found a great patch to study, to slowly absorb the sounds and behavior of these interesting western species.

Today I learned to tell female from male Spotted Towhee. The females have soft brown heads and necks, whereas the males’ are black. (I kind of prefer the look of the females, TBH.) Getting to know their songs also, as they’ve been singing for a week or two.

Soon I’ll hear more Wasatch-area birdsong as spring fast approaches.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 9:15 a.m., I hiked a couple hundred feet up the mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie*
2. House Finch*
3. American Robin*
4. Black-capped Chickadee**
5. Northern Flicker (v)
6. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
7. Dark-eyed Junco
8. Sharp-shinned Hawk
9. Spotted Towhee
10. Golden Eagle
11. Pine Siskin
12. Ruby-crowned Kinglet (v)

Elsewhere

13. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
14. California Quail
15. Eurasian Collared Dove

Mammals

Rocky Mountain Elk

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Raven Blessing

Monday, March 9th, 2020
Common Raven, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 09 March 2020.
Common Raven.
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 09 March 2020.
Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay.

A warmish, damp, and windy morning. Mostly overcast. Winds of 15 to 20 miles an hour, I bet—breezier than any morning hike here so far. Not as many bird species as yesterday, but plenty of interest.

Especially thrilling was the pair of ravens that soared silently over to check out a man and his dog descending from a good hike. Looked up, and there they were—floating in the breeze not thirty feet above us. Gotta tell you, I felt blessed.

I haven’t experienced an entire month of March here yet, but I’d be surprised if the remnant snow patches last more than a few days.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 9:30 a.m. (DST), I hiked a few hundred feet up the mountain.

1. Black-billed Magpie*
2. Pine Siskin
3. Black-capped Chickadee
4. House Finch**
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
7. Dark-eyed Junco
8. Golden Eagle
9. Northern Flicker (v)
10. Common Raven

Elsewhere

11. American Robin
12. Lesser Goldfinch (v)

Mammals

Rocky Mountain Elk

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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