28 October 2020

Posts Tagged ‘Virginia’s warbler’

A Moment in Time

Friday, August 28th, 2020
Sharp-shinned Hawk (imm.), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 28 August 2020.
Sharp-shinned Hawk (imm.).

About two-thirds of the way through my lovely hike with dog this morning, as we made our way along a familiar deer trail up among the junipers, I heard the distinctive kip-kip-kip-kip-kip! of a Sharp-shinned Hawk. We stopped. I didn’t see the hawk, and I couldn’t even tell how far away it was.

But I’ve learned to look for other birds who might indicate where we might find the little hawk. (I’m imagining a person moving silently to a closed door and pointing urgently with eyes wide.) Nearly always a hummingbird will head to where the danger is. So will scrub-jays if they’re about (they were). They converged around a juniper, and out popped the hawk—who flew across the trail and dove into another juniper.

Two jays, a hummingbird, and a Spotted Towhee ended up there, too. The hawk hunkered down deep in the tree—but I asked Jack to stay and snuck around to where the sun was behind me. Took about a minute, but I finally managed to contort myself in such a way that I could grab a quick photo of an interesting moment in time.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:04 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Mourning Dove
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. House Finch**
5. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
6. Spotted Towhee
7. Barn Swallow
8. Red-breasted Nuthatch
9. Downy Woodpecker
10. Broad-tailed Hummingbird*
11. Black-capped Chickadee
12. Lesser Goldfinch**
13. Virginia’s Warbler
14. Sharp-shinned Hawk
15. Black-billed Magpie*

Elsewhere

16. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)
17. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Hummers, revisited

Friday, August 21st, 2020
Immature Rufous Hummingbird, 21 August 2020, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84109.
Immature Rufous Hummingbird.

Not as warm as yesterday, nor as crystal clear. Fact is, density of particulates in the air has risen lately on account of the crazy number of California wildfires.

But still, birds abounding. Most interesting to me lately have been the interactions of various hummingbird species. The Black-chinned variety tend to be rather peaceful and easy to get along with—at least compared to the feisty broadtails are notoriously territorial.

But not as territorial (in my limited experience) as Rufous Hummingbirds—a few immature individuals of which I’ve seen lately—although you’d never know it by the single young male I spotted today, who sat calmly on a perch ,as a female black-chinned perched nervously above.

Yes, I’ve been on kind of a hummingbird kick these days. Have loved watching their complex behavior—including their occasional hovering a few feet from my face, apparently curious about little ol’ human me.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:01 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Mourning Dove*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay**
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Blue-gray Gnatcatcherdd
5. Spotted Towhee
6. Rock Pigeon
7. Black-billed Magpie*
8. Red-breasted Nuthatch
9. Black-capped Chickadee
10. Downy Woodpecker
11. Virginia’s Warbler
12. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
13. Canada Goose
14. Rufous Hummingbird
15. House Finch**
16. Lazuli Bunting

Elsewhere

17. House Sparrow (v)
18. Eurasian Collared Dove
19. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Jays

Wednesday, August 19th, 2020

The jaybirds are different here in Utah than they were in Maine. I’ve only seen two species—Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay and Steller’s Jay—but they (along with the Black-billed Magpie) have expanded my appreciating for corvids generally.

Scrub-jays were quiet for a good while in late spring and summer, but they’ve returned in the past week or two. Somehow convinced one to pose for a photo even.

Was a very good hike today with Captain Jack. An hour and forty-five minutes, two-plus miles, fifteen bird species—also a bunny and a squirrel.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:01 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. House Finch*
2. Black-chinned Hummingbird
3. Mourning Dove
4. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
5. Lesser Goldfinch**
6. Broad-tailed Hummingbird
7. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Chipping Sparrow
10. Black-capped Chickadee**
11. Lazuli Bunting
12. Rock Pigeon*
13. Virginia’s Warbler
14. American Robin
15. Cooper’s Hawk

Elsewhere

16. Eurasian Collared Dove (v)

Mammals

Mountain Cottontail
Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2020 by 3IP