14 August 2022

Posts Tagged ‘mule deer’

FOY Birds

Monday, April 18th, 2022
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (first-of-year bird), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 18 April 2021.
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (first-of-year).

A bright morning, temps about 45 (F) or so. Slight breeze. Looked like the overnight wind directly was more or less southerly, so I thought it possible a new migrant or two might pop up somewhere.

Welp, two did.

The first was a Chipping Sparrow that popped up in a juniper along the deer trail as I was looking to spot a junco. Was a lovely surprise.

The second was a Blue-gray Gnatcatcher that popped up on our return hike (by which time the temperature was much warmer). Actually heard the bird first, then spied it—also in a juniper.

I’d forgotten how much joy first-of year spring migrants bring.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:58 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. American Robin*
2. House Finch*
3. Spotted Towhee
4. Black-capped Chickadee**
5. Rock Pigeon
6. Pine Siskin** (v)
7. Black-billed Magpie*
8. Northern Flicker (v)
9. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
10. California Quail* (v)
11. Lesser Goldfinch (v)
12. Cooper’s Hawk
13. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
14. Dark-eyed Junco
15. Chipping Sparrow
16. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
17. Turkey Vulture

Elsewhere

18. Eurasian Collared-dove
19. House Sparrow
20. European Starling

Mammals

Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Excavators

Sunday, April 17th, 2022
Chickadee excavation techniques, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 17 April 2022.
Chickadee excavation techniques.

On the chilly morning of a warm day, dog and I had a lovely hike up in the foothills. Some nice sightings of bird species doing interesting things. (E.g., a Chukar calling from high on a ridge.) A few decent photos, too. A lot of spring things for Jack to smell.

Interesting to me was watching a pair of chickadees excavating a nest about halfway up the gully trail. We we got to their nest cavity, I didn’t see or hear the birds at all—which I attributed was due to a Cooper’s Hawk nearby—and sure enough a Cooper’s took wing, calling, and then the chickadees showed up, taking turns entering the hole and exiting with mouthfuls of chipped wood. (While in there, I could hear their excavations.)

Lots of birds at home, too. For possibly the first day this season, there was no trace of deep-seated doubt that spring is here.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:58 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Eurasian Collared-dove
2. Pine Siskin**
3. American Robin*
4. Spotted Towhee
5. Black-capped Chickadee
6. House Finch*
7. Song Sparrow* (v)
8. Northern Flicker*
9. Cooper’s Hawk
10. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
11. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
12. Chukar
13. California Quail* (v)
14. Hairy Woodpecker
15. Turkey Vulture

Elsewhere

16. Lesser Goldfinch
17. House Sparrow
18. European Starling

Mammals

Mule Deer
Red Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

Springier

Saturday, April 16th, 2022
Spotted Towhee, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 16 April 2022.
Spotted Towhee.

Overcast and hazy sun this morning. Birds about—plenty of ’em, vocalizing and moving around—although no crazy migrants yet. Breeze was from the southwest, though, so favorable for mogration.

Wren again, nesting chickadees, five kinglets, a Cooper’s. Lots of birds in the neighborhood, too—and in town (including a domestic mallard in Sugar House that I did not list here).

Deer, too, and the voice of a quail.

Grandeur Peak Area List
At 7:47 a.m., sun time, I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Pine Siskin**
2. American Robin*
2. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
3. Spotted Towhee
5. Rock Pigeon*
6. Black-capped Chickadee
7. Rock Wren
8. House Finch* (v)
9. California Quail* (v)
10. Northern Flicker*
11. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
12. Ruby-crowned Kinglet
13. Cooper’s Hawk (v)
14. Red-tailed Hawk
15. Song Sparrow* (v)

Elsewhere

18. Lesser Goldfinch
16. House Sparrow
17. Eurasian Collared-dove
18. European Starling
20. Mourning Dove
21. California Gull

Mammals

Red Squirrel
Mule Deer

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2022 by 3IP