24 November 2020

Posts Tagged ‘blac-chinned hummingbird’

City Birds

Tuesday, July 21st, 2020
Rock Pigeons, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 21 July 2020.
Rock Pigeons.

Among the birds I find up on the high trails are quite a few city birds—that is, birds that are more abundant down in the basin, where the people are. Not a few of these are non-native species (e.g., European Starlings, Eurasian Collared Doves), although even some native birds prefer the neighborhoods at certain times of year.

House Sparrow, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 21 July 2020.
House Sparrow.

This morning, dog and I encountered two common city varieties—Rock Pigeons and House Sparrows. Pigeon flocks aren’t an uncommon sight in summer above the trailhead, but I’ve seen few House Sparrows up there. Well, today, three ventured a couple hundred feet up to where we were enjoying the view.

So here’s to our city birds, near neighbors, survivors.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8 a.m., I hiked a few hundred feet up a mountain.

1. Rock Pigeon*
2. American Robin*
3. Black-chinned Hummingbird
4. Lazuli Bunting
6. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
7. Mourning Dove*
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Lesser Goldfinch** (v)
10. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
11. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
12. Pine Siskin (v)
13. Warbling Vireo
14. Western Tanager
15. Black-billed Magpie (v)
16. Downy Woodpecker (v)
17. House Sparrow**

Elsewhere

18. California Quail
19. Eurasian Collared Dove

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Cool Morning

Wednesday, July 15th, 2020
Lazuli Buntings (mama and juvie), East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 15 July 2020.
Lazuli Buntings (mama and juvie).

A cool morning, a cloudless sky, a man and his dog headed up the trail again. The day began with the cries of a juvie Red-tailed Hawk and ended with the glide of a Turkey Vulture as we descended from a height.

In the interim, we encountered a load of birds—mostly (it seemed) fledgling Lazuli Buntings (a lot fewer singers than yesterday). but also a massive flock of Rock Pigeons, a flitting Black-throated Gray Warbler, and miscellaneous other usual suspects.

Our hike did include a spontaneous climb up to the cairn overlook—which left us both a little tuckered out, what with our advanced ages and all.

But seems we lived (truly lived) to see another day.

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:30 a.m., I hiked about 1,000 feet up a mountain.

1. Red-tailed Hawk
2. Rock Pigeon*
3. House Finch**
4. American Robin*
5. Black-headed Grosbeak
6. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
7. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay
8. Black-chinned Hummingbird
9. Lazuli Bunting
10. Spotted Towhee
11. Black-billed Magpie* (v)
12. Mourning Dove*
13. Pine Siskin (v)
14. Black-capped Chickadee
15. Black-throated Gray warbler
16. Warbling Vireo
17. Turkey Vulture

Elsewhere

18. Eurasian Collared Dove
19. House Sparrow
20. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

Redtails

Saturday, July 11th, 2020
Juvie (left) and adult Red-tailed Hawks, East Millcreek, Salt Lake City, Utah, 11 July 2020.
Juvie (left) and adult Red-tailed Hawks.

Few sounds in nature thrill me like the scream of a Red-tailed Hawk. Maybe it’s the fact that I haven’t heard it often (not counting in movies or on TV, where the sound is commonly—hilariously—used to represent vultures or eagles). Or maybe because it’s so unique, unmistakable, and ethereal: it’s not very loud, but it carries.

Since moving to Utah nearly a year ago, I’ve heard the cries of a redtails in the mountains three or four times—possibly as many times as I did in my two score years in Maine. [Aside: the Red-tailed Hawk is arguably the commonest hawk in North America.] Today, I got that thrill five or six times in a matter of a few minutes.

Over the past few days, I’ve spotted a young redtail down near the trailhead, hanging out on utility poles. It’s been quite vocal, but its voice is that of a young bird: a fast series of high-pitched squeals—nothing at all like the ethereal voice of an adult.

Today I saw juvie and adult together atop a pole. The former just sat there, squealing occasionally; the latter repeatedly released its inimitable cry.

“Flyyy!” it seemed to say. “Flyyy!”

Grandeur Peak Area List
Beginning at 8:15 a.m., I hiked some 1,200 feet up a mountain.

1. Black-headed Grosbeak
2. Mourning Dove
3. Lazuli Bunting
4. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
5. Woodhouse’s Scrub-jay (v)
6. Black-chinned Hummingbird
7. House Finch**
8. Spotted Towhee
9. Blue-gray Gnatcatcher
10. American Robin*
11. Red-tailed Hawk
12. Rock Pigeon*
13. Black-billed Magpie*
14. Broad-tailed Hummingbird*
15. Warbling Vireo
16. Golden Eagle
17. Turkey Vulture
18. Northern Flicker (v)
19. Song Sparrow (v)

Elsewhere

20. Eurasian Collared Dove
21. California Quail

Mammals

Rock Squirrel

(v) Voice only
*Also elsewhere

**Voice only elsewhere

 
Bird Report is a (sometimes intermittent) record of the birds I encounter while hiking, see while driving, or spy outside my window. —Brian Willson



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