29 May 2015 Rockport, Maine, USA 
vardenafil vs sildenafil comprar cialis 20 mg original genericos viagra cialis discount donde comprar levitra sin receta
vendita cialis online proscar rezeptfrei apteekki netissУЄ viagra 25 mg precio kamagra deutschland las mujeres pueden tomar cialis levitra ou viagra viagra mas barata levitra vs generic cuanto vale una pastilla de viagra
comment obtenir le chlorhydrate de lidocaine acheter colchicine en ligne furosemide le monde le clomiphene reliable dapoxetine pharmacies
acheter pilule viagra achat cialis medicament cialis tadalafil prix medicamento viagra cialis vs viagra cual es mejor
    how often can i take diflucan 150 mg prednisone 5 mg ulotka flagyl tablets for racing pigeons azithromycin mail order fluconazole no prescription needed

Posts Tagged ‘blue jay’

Nesters

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015
Yellow Warbler, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 27 May 2015.

Yellow Warbler.

’Tis the nesting season hereabouts. In my early morning hike with dog, I came first upon an active Eastern Phoebe nest. Then I spied a female Black-throated Green Warbler hopping about in the greening tangles on the ground—and up she came with nest strands in her bill.

Ovenbird, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 27 May 2015.

Ovenbird.

Not long after, I took note of an Ovenbird on a perch, an Ovenbird with a face full of the old gauzy bones of a hardwood leaf. Jus sitting there, waiting for Jack and me to split the scene.

And toward the summit, where the Yellow Warblers hang out, I spotted a female pulling scraps of fluff from a caterpillar tent—a practice I’ve seen before very near that same spot. When we stood dead still and waited for a few minutes for her to return, I happened to see another tent farther along the trail, and there she was over there. (Saw a Chestnut-sided Warbler using this trick, as well.)

All sorts of other nesting behavior goin’ on, too. Including—during a second hike in afternoon—a Savannah Sparrow singing from the peak of the roof of Beech Nut. Again. Third season in a row.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 6:45 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Ovenbird**
2. Red-eyed Vireo (v)
3. Black-throated Green Warbler**
4. Black-and-white Warbler (v)
5. Eastern Phoebe**
6. Eastern Wood-pewee
7. Veery** (v)
8. American Redstart** (v)
9. American Goldfinch
10. Chestnut-sided Warbler (v)
11. Common Yellowthroat
12. Mourning Dove*
13. Gray Catbird
14. Alder Flycatcher
15. Northern Cardinal
16. Northern Flicker (v)
17. Yellow Warbler**
18. Song Sparrow
19. American Crow*
20. Nashville Warbler (v)
21. Black-capped Chickadee
22. Tufted Titmouse
23. Field Sparrow
24. Chipping Sparrow
25. Rose-breasted Grosbeak
26. Brown-headed Cowbird**
27. American Robin
28. Osprey
29. Cedar Waxwing
30. Blue Jay
31. Purple Finch
32. Black-throated Blue Warbler (v)
33. Scarlet Tanager* (v)

And at about 2:30 this afternoon…

34. Great Crested Flyatcher** (v)
35. Broad-winged Hawk
36. Herring Gull*

Elsewhere

37. Laughing Gull (v)
38. House Sparrow

v = Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 

Smitten, bug-bitten

Monday, May 25th, 2015
Alder Flycatcher, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 25 May 2015.

Alder Flycatcher.

This morning was the first warm one in a while. T-shirted it up Beech Hill first thing with Jack.

Of course, that meant a few bug bites. In fact, I stood there calmly and let a bunch of black flies and a mosquito or two bit the hell out of me—while I was taking photos (or, in one case, a video). I’ve learned that if I don’t mess with my bug bites, they don’t bother me very long. Anyway, it’s (usually) a small price to pay for a semi-decent shot.

Eastern Towhee, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 25 May 2015.

Eastern Towhee.

Among today’s photos was a shot of one of many Alder Flycatchers up there this morning. There were also phoebes and pewees and at least one Great Crested Flycatcher. There was also a big flock of waxwings, a booming partridge, anxious Ovenbirds, and two singing male tanagers.

Plus, I watched a hummingbird browsing among the blossoms of one of many suddenly blooming apple trees.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 6:30 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Red-eyed Vireo**
2. Tufted Titmouse** (v)
3. Black-capped Chickadee (v)
4. American Redstart**
5. Scarlet Tanager
6. Eastern Phoebe**
7. Ovenbird
8. Chestnut-sided Warbler
9. Northern Cardinal** (v)
10. White-breasted Nuthatch (v)
11. Great Crested Flycatcher (v)
12. Black-and-white Warbler (v)
13. Eastern Towhee
14. Common Yellowthroat
15. Ruby-throated Hummingbird
16. American Goldfinch
17. Gray Catbird
18. Alder Flycatcher
19. Blue Jay** (v)
20. Mourning Dove (v)
21. Ruffed Grouse (drumming)
22. Black-throated Green Warbler (v)
23. Yellow Warbler
24. Veery
25. Song Sparrow
26. Field Sparrow (v)
27. American Robin*
28. Nashville Warbler
29. Chipping Sparrow (v)
30. Brown-headed Cowbird
31. Common Raven
32. Osprey
33. American Crow (v)
34. Cedar Waxwing
35. Eastern Wood-pewee (v)
36. Black-throated Blue Warbler (v)
37. Purple Finch (v)
38. Rose-breasted Grosbeak (v)

Elsewhere

39. Herring Gull
40. Laughing Gull (v)

v = Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere

 

A little warmth

Sunday, May 24th, 2015
Yellow Warbler, Beech Hill Preserve, Rockport, Maine, 24 May 2015.

Yellow Warbler.

Very chilly and breezy again this morning, but the sun came out before too long, and the air temperature began to rise. On getting out of the truck at Beech Hill first thing, I heard no birdsong at all for about fifteen or twenty seconds—crazy at this time of year—but after a two-hour hike with dog I ended up with three dozen species.

And attending a nice afternoon party at Sennebec Lake this afternoon—wearing shorts and a Hawaiian shirt, I might just mention—I added a couple other species, including a first-of-year oriole.

Was especially nice to hear the voice of a cuckoo at Beech Hill, though, I have to say. Tent caterpillars are fairly abundant this year, so I’ll be on the lookout for one of those guys as the year goes on.

Beech Hill List
Beginning at 7 a.m., I hiked all trails.

1. Red-eyed Vireo**
2. Scarlet Tanager
3. Eastern Phoebe**
4. American Redstart*
5. Ovenbird** (v)
6. Black-throated Green Warbler (v)
7. Great Crested Flycatcher (v)
8. Black-and-white Warbler (v)
9. Veery
10. Chestnut-sided Warbler**
11. Black-capped Chickadee*
12. Eastern Towhee
13. Common Yellowthroat**
14. Nashville Warbler (v)
15. Mourning Dove*
16. Gray Catbird**
17. Common Loon (v)
18. American Goldfinch**
19. Northern Cardinal** (v)
20. Alder Flycatcher (v)
21. Yellow Warbler*
22. American Crow*
23. Song Sparrow** (v)
24. Tufted Titmouse**
25. Black-billed Cuckoo† (v)
26. Rose-breasted Grosbeak (v)
27. American Robin**
28. Chipping Sparrow (v)
29. Brown-headed Cowbird (v)
30. White-breasted Nuthatch
31. Field Sparrow
32. Savannah Sparrow (v)
33. Blue Jay (v)
34. Cedar Waxwing†
35. Black-throated Blue Warbler (v)
36. Eastern Wood-pewee (v)

Elsewhere

37. Herring Gull
38. European Starling
39. Baltimore Oriole†
40. Common Grackle
41. Least Flycatcher
42. Purple Finch

v = Voice only
*Also elsewhere
**Voice only elsewhere
†First-of-year bird

 

 

 
Bird Report is an intermittent record of what's outside my window in Rockport, Maine, USA (44°08'N latitude, 69°06'W longitude), and vicinity. —Brian Willson



3IP Logo
©1997–2015 by 3IP